Readers Bill Of Rights

Readers Bill Of Rights

Readers Bill Of Rights

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The “Readers Bill of Rights” is a concept that emphasizes the rights and freedoms of readers. It’s a declaration that underscores the importance of readers having certain expectations and entitlements when engaging with literature.

Readers Bill Of Rights

What are the Readers Bill Of Rights?

While there is no universally agreed-upon document or formalised “Readers Bill of Rights,” various literary organisations, libraries, and advocates have expressed similar sentiments over the years. These principles typically include:

  1. Freedom to Choose: Readers have the right to choose their reading materials without censorship or undue influence. They should be free to explore a wide range of genres, topics, and perspectives.
  2. Freedom of Expression: Readers have the right to express their opinions about the books they read, whether through reviews, discussions, or other forms of communication. This includes the right to like or dislike a book without facing censorship or judgment.
  3. Access to Information: Readers should have access to a diverse and comprehensive range of reading materials. This includes access to books from various cultures, languages, and viewpoints.
  4. Privacy: Readers have the right to read in private without fear of surveillance or judgment. Libraries and bookstores should respect the privacy of readers and protect their reading records.
  5. Freedom from Censorship: Readers have the right to read books without censorship. Efforts to ban or restrict access to certain books should be opposed in the interest of intellectual freedom.
  6. Open Access to Libraries and Bookstores: Readers should have open and equitable access to libraries and bookstores, ensuring that they can explore a wide array of books regardless of their socioeconomic status.
  7. Quality Information: Readers have the right to accurate and truthful information. Publishers and authors should strive for accuracy, and readers should be able to trust the information presented in the books they read.

While these principles capture the essence of a Readers Bill of Rights, it’s important to note that the specifics can vary, and different organisations may emphasise particular aspects. These principles collectively underscore the value of intellectual freedom, diversity, and open access in the world of literature.

Readers Bill Of Rights

Readers Bill Of Rights according to Daniel Pennac

Daniel Pennac, a French author, and teacher, outlined the “Readers Bill of Rights” in his book “Better than Life” (“Comme un Roman” in French). Pennac’s “Readers Bill of Rights” is a set of ten rights that emphasize the importance of fostering a love of reading and creating a positive environment for readers. Here are Pennac’s ten rights:

  1. The Right Not to Read: Every reader has the right to put down a book that isn’t capturing their interest. They should not feel obligated to finish a book they are not enjoying.
  2. The Right to Skip Pages: Readers have the right to skip pages, paragraphs, or chapters without feeling guilty. Sometimes, skipping ahead can enhance the reading experience.
  3. The Right Not to Finish a Book: Readers are not obliged to finish a book they’ve started. If a book isn’t resonating with them, they have the right to abandon it.
  4. The Right to Re-read: Readers can re-read books they’ve enjoyed. Re-reading allows for a deeper understanding and appreciation of a text.
  5. The Right to Read Anything: Readers have the freedom to choose any book, regardless of genre, style, or perceived literary merit.
  6. The Right to “Bovary-ism,” or the Right to Identify with a Character: Readers can identify with and find similarities with characters in books, even if those characters are flawed or make poor choices.
  7. The Right to Read Anywhere: Readers can enjoy books in any location, whether it’s on a train, in a café, or at home. There are no strict rules about where one can or cannot read.
  8. The Right to Dip In: Readers can dip in and out of books, reading them in a non-linear fashion if they prefer.
  9. The Right to Read Out Loud: Readers can read books aloud, sharing the experience with others.
  10. The Right to Remain Silent: Readers have the right to keep their reading experiences private and not share them if they choose not to.

Daniel Pennac’s “Readers Bill of Rights” is often celebrated for its emphasis on the joy of reading and the personal, subjective nature of the reading experience. It encourages a positive and inclusive approach to literature, promoting the idea that reading should be a source of pleasure rather than a chore or an obligation.

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